Defining Your Moving Charges

In a continuing effort to empower our customers to make informed decisions when it comes to moving, we would like to continue our highlight on industry terminology.  As we mentioned before, the business of relocation has developed a vocabulary all of its own over time. Without understanding what these words mean it can become increasingly difficult to navigate not only the search for your preferred mover but the contractual process. The following are some of the key terms used to describe the kinds of charges that you may encounter.

ACCESSORIAL CHARGES

An Accessorial Charge is an extra, additional, special or supplemental charge. These charges are associated with services offered by moving companies such as packing or unpacking but can also include Flight Charges and Pickup and Delivery Charges. In general, these are fees associated with extra services that you request. But it is important to pay attention to Accessorial Charges that can become included based on the nature and scope of your move. Paying close attention to the terms in your contract can help you to avoid hidden fees.

LINE HAUL vs. FLIGHT CHARGE

As mentioned in one of our Terminology Tuesday posts, a Line Haul Charge is a term used to describe basic charges for long distance moves calculated by mileage and weight of total shipment. But a Flight Charge is generally calculated in addition to this figure. Flight Charges are additional fees associated with a moving crew relocating your items up and down flights of stairs as this creates a need for extra time and effort on the part of the team. These fees can be avoided if there is an elevator available to the crew that is large enough to transport your belongings.

PICKUP AND DELIVERY CHARGES

Many people may take for granted that they understand what movers mean by Pick up and Delivery Charges. But most often you will find this defined as “Separate transportation charges applicable for transporting your shipment between the storage-in-transit warehouse and your residence.” This cost is generally only a factor if you will be needing to use storage in between moving from one place to another. It is a good idea to read the fine print when it comes to not only a moving companies taking your items to storage and storing them, but also, how much it will cost to move them on to their final and eventual destination.

Terminology Tuesday

At times understanding the mumbo jumbo in a lease can leave you scratching your head and feeling like you need a lawyer just to sign it. Take these glossary terms and terminology will most definitely help you in your journey through moving.  

Co-tenant– A person who agrees to a lease or rental agreement together with one or more other persons who will also occupy the premises.
Domicile- The state in which one maintains a permanent home to which he or she intends to return (even though residing in another state).
Forfeiture- Loss of the tenant’s continued rights under a lease.
Guaranty- An agreement as it pertains to a lease, whereby a person who will not occupy the premises guarantees that the tenant will perform his or her obligations under a lease or rental agreement.
Joint tenancy– A means of owning property by two or more owners. If one of the owners dies, the other owner or owners automatically take over that person’s portion of the ownership.
Periodic tenancy– A rental agreement that runs from week-to-week, month-to-month, or year-to-year.
Rent– The compensation paid by the tenant to the landlord for use of the premises.
Rent control law– A law (usually enacted by a city, but sometimes by a county or state) that limits the amount by which a landlord may raise rents.
Security deposit– An amount of money given to the landlord by the tenant at the outset of the tenancy, to secure the tenant’s performance of certain legal obligations specified in the lease or rental agreement – such as payment of rent and cleaning the premises at termination of the tenancy.
Sub lessee– A person who subleases a tenancy from a sub lessor
sub lessor– A tenant who subleases his or her tenancy to someone else.
Tenancy in common– A form of owning property by more than one person, in which each person owns an undivided interest in the whole property. Unlike joint tenancy, the interests do not have to be equal, and upon the death of a tenant in common, his or her interest does not pass automatically to the co-tenants, but is disposed of in the same way as all other property.
Tenant– Some who enters into occupation of property with the permission of the owner.
Tenant association– Another name for a tenant union.
Tenant at will– A person who occupies property with the landlord’s permission with no clear agreement as to how long the tenant may stay. The law will usually allow either party to terminate a tenancy at will on 30 days written notice.
Tenant union– A group of tenants who organize in order to further their common interests as tenants.

Terminology Tuesday!

Elevator Carry: An adtermsditional fee that most moving companies charge in order to transport your goods in an elevator either at the pickup point or destination. To ensure the mover’s are aware of your particular moving needs, let them know if an elevator will be part of the move.

Full Service Move: The most common type of move with the carrier moving your household items from your old address to your new address. All the items are picked up from the originating rooms and placed in the new rooms. Furniture is wrapped in blankets for protection during transport. For an additional fee, full service providers will pack and unpack your boxes and hook-up your appliances.

Line haul Charges: Basic charges for long distance moves calculated by mileage and weight of your total shipment. Line haul charges are usually on top of additional charges.

Mobile Container: Large storage containers that are delivered to your home and will remain at your residence until you have completed loading them with your goods, then request pick-up from the moving company.

Operating Authority: The certification issued by a state or federal governmental department authorizing a mover or carrier to move household goods between designated geographical areas.

Re-Weigh: Depending on the kind of estimate you received, your goods may be re-weighed once they’ve been loaded on the truck. The moving charge would then be based on the re-weigh amount.

Total Loss: Restricted insurance for your household goods based on complete loss of your belongings. Make sure you check the details to ensure you are covered.

Warehouse Handling: An additional charge applicable each time storage-in-transit service is provided. This charge refers to the physical movement and removal of items within the warehouse.

Terminology Tuesday!

Bill of Lading – customer’s receipt for goods and contract for transportation. The customer’s signature acknowledges that the household goods can be loaded on the van and released to the carrier.

DOT – Department of Transportation – the federal agency which, through the Surface Transportation Board (STB) and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) within the DOT, governs the interstate transportation industry, including movers of household goods.

Method of Payment – payment must be in the form of cash, traveler’s checks, money order, a bank cashier’s check or a credit card. Credit card payment must be pre-approved prior to loading. Personal checks are not accepted.

Origin & Destination Service Charge – a hundredweight rate that applies based on the weight of the shipment plus any weight additives and location where the shipment is picked up and delivered. The charges compensate the carrier for basic handling and servicing of the shipment; services include: elevator, stair and excessive distance carries, piano and organ flight carries, additional transportation charge (ATC), basic appliance servicing, which means preparation of appliances to make them safe to ship, and on shipments moving transborder between the US and Canada, the import and export service charge.

PBO (packed by owner) – when articles are packed by the customer for moving

Carrier – the moving company providing interstate transportation of household goods under whose Department of Transportation registration the shipment is moved.

Diversion – when a customer changes the destination of their shipment after it is en route, transportation charges shall be calculated from the point of origin, to the point at which the carrier is able to effect the diversion, plus the transportation charge from the diversion point to the new destination point.

Order Number – used to identify the customer’s shipment and appears on the upper right corner of the Order for Service and the Bill of Lading. This number should be used whenever the carrier is contacted.

Overflow – when articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery.

Terminology Tuesday!

Our series of Terminology Tuesday is to help YOU avoid all moving problems by being informed and planning ahead. Unfortunately there are so many scam moving companies who will take advantage of you. We want to make sure you know your Rights and Responsibilities when it comes to you and your precious belongings. To keep you informed, we define moving terms to help you understand the moving lingo so the scam moving companies cannot get away with much. This week we wanted to inform you of resources that will help you learn more about your Rights and Responsibilities.

You can receive a copy of Your Rights and Responsibilities and other helpful consumer information at http://www.protectyourmove.gov

To find out whether a mover is registered with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration visit http://www.protectyoumove.gov

You can obtain information about a mover, broker or freight forwarder’s insurance and process agent by visiting http://www.li-public.fmcsa.dot.gov or by calling (202) 385-2423

To get assistance to determine if a mover has assessed the correct transportation charges call the Surface Transportation Board at (866) 254-1792

To file a complaint against a mover visit http://www.protectyourmove.gov

“The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) develops, maintains and enforces Federal regulations that establish safe operating requirements for commercial vehicle drivers, carriers, vehicles and vehicle equipment. The FMCSA regulates household goods movers and requires them to register with the agency. It’s regulations protect consumers on interstate moves and define the rights and responsibilities of consumers and household goods carriers”

Terminology Tuesday!

First and foremost, we want to stress the importance of determining if your mover is registered with FMCSA by accessing www.protectyourmove.gov or calling FMCSA at (202) 385 9805. Unfortunately, we hear so many horror stories of people signing with moving companies that seem to be too good to be true and we want to stress to you that anything that seems too good to be true… Probably is! Hopefully, our Terminology Tuesday series will help you know and understand the information provided by the professional mover. The expert mover should provide you with the following basic documents as a part of your move.

Estimates: estimates should be clearly described- in writing– do not accept oral estimates. Here at Exodus, we believe in order to get the most accurate estimate you must see what you are estimating. Therefore, we are more than happy to give you an in person estimate.

Order For Service: this is a list of all the services the mover will perform and shows the dates that the household goods will be picked up and delivered.

Bill of Landing: contract between you and the mover and receipt of ALL your belongings. You should be given a partially completed form before the vehicle even leaves the residence of origin.

Inventory List: receipt showing each item you shipped and its condition. At Exodus we provide and go over the inventory list with you so we can agree on the description of the goods condition before and after the move.

Applicable Transportation Charges: charges that a mover assesses for its services must be contained in a published tariff which MUST be made available upon request. If you feel that a mover has overcharged you, you can contact the Surface Transportation Board at (866) 254 1792 to obtain assistance.

Filing a Complaint: you may file a complaint against a mover by visiting www.protectyourmove.org or calling 1-888-DOT-SAFT Monday-Friday.

We hope that you never go through the typical horror moves that we too often hear about. It is super important that you understand your rights and your responsibilities before selecting a mover. We believe that the best way to avoid problems is to be informed and plan ahead.

Terminology Tuesday!

AppliTTance Service – preparation of major electrical appliances to make them safe for shipment                               

Bill of Lading – the receipt for your goods and the contract for their transportation. It is your responsibility to understand the bill of lading before you sign it. If you do not agree with something on the bill of lading, do not sign it until you are satisfied that it is correct. The bill of lading is an important document. Don’t lose or misplace your copy.

Certified Scale: any scale designed for weighing motor vehicles, including trailers or semitrailers not attached to a tractor, and certified by an authorized scale inspector and licensing authority. A certified scale may also be a platform or warehouse type scale that is properly inspected and certified.

Door-to-Door Service: services provided from the point of origin to the destination residence. Door-to-door service doesn’t cover accessorial services and their corresponding fees.

Home buyout: A relocation perk. A company that is relocating an employee or hiring a new employee agrees to buy the employee’s current home to facilitate the employee’s relocation.

Intrastate: A move within a state, but generally outside the 30-mile limit that defines a local move.

Estimate, Non-binding: this is the carrier’s approximation of the cost, based on the estimated weight of the shipment and the accessorial services requested. A non-binding estimate is not binding on the mover. The final charges will be based upon the actual weight of your shipment, the services provided and the tariff provisions in effect.

Interstate: A move that crosses state lines.

Local Move: a move within the boundaries of the state, which does not exceed a distance of 100 miles (160 kilometers). The cost of this type of move is determined by the hour. 

Permanent Storage: the option given to customers who plan to store their goods for an indefinite period of time. Permanent storage automatically begins once the storage-in-transit period has expired. Once a customer’s goods go into permanent storage, he/she must adhere to the rules and regulations of the warehouse in which they are stored.

Terminology Tuesday!

Terminology Tuesday!

Depending on the move, the specifics and details can get confusing. That’s why we created Terminology Tuesdays where each week we will go over five moving terms that will help you have a better understanding of your moving process. Be sure to check out our archives, we’ll be doing this each week. Enjoy!

Carrier – the moving company providing interstate transportation of household goods under whose Department of Transportation registration the shipment is moved. 

Diversion – when a customer changes the destination of their shipment after it is en route, transportation charges shall be calculated from the point of origin, to the point at which the carrier is able to effect the diversion, plus the transportation charge from the diversion point to the new destination point.

Order Number – used to identify the customer’s shipment and appears on the upper right corner of the Order for Service and the Bill of Lading. This number should be used whenever the carrier is contacted. 

Overflow – when articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery.

Survey – performed by an agent to examine the customer’s belongings in order to develop an estimate of move charges.

Van Operator – oversees the loading, hauling and unloading of your possessions.

Terminology Tuesday!

Depending on the move, the specifics and details can get confusing. That’s why we created Terminology Tuesdays where each week we will go over five moving terms that will help you have a better understanding of your moving process. Be sure to check out our archives, we’ll be doing this each week. Enjoy!TT

 

Order for Service – a document authorizing the moving company to transport your household goods. 

SIT aka Storage-in-Transit  – the temporary storage of your household goods in the warehouse of the carrier’s agent, pending further transportation at a later date. SIT service may not exceed a total of 180 calendar days. After 180 days, the interstate nature of the shipment ends and is converted to the rules of the local warehouseman. 

Fuel Surcharge – just as it sounds, the carrier’s tariff provides for a percentage adjustment to the transportation charge, and SIT Pickup and Delivery, to aid in the recovery of the increased cost of fuel. The surcharge, which can change monthly, is based upon the national average cost of diesel as reported by the U.S. Department of Energy. 

Shuttle Service – As most of you might be familiar with, a shuttle service is used if the assigned over-the-road van is unable to make a normal pickup or delivery because of physical constraints. A shuttle service is the use of a secondary, smaller vehicle to complete the pickup or delivery. Charges for this service are based on the weight of the shipment and the location where the service is performed. 

Tariff – a publication containing the carrier’s rates, rules and regulations for services performed, applicable to the customer’s move.

Terminology Tuesday!

Depending on the move, the specifics and details can get confusing. That’s why we created Terminology Tuesdays where each week we will go over five moving terms that will help you have a better understanding of your moving process. Be sure to check out our archives, we’ll be doing this each week. Enjoy!

Binding and Non-Binding Estimate – a binding estimate is an agreement made in advance between the customer and the mover that guarantees the total cost of the move based on the quantities and services shown on the estimate. A non-binding estimate is the carrier’s approx. of the cost based on the estimated weight of the shipment and the accessorial services requested. A non-binding estimate is not binding on the carrier and the final charges will be based on the actual weight and tariff provisions in effect on the day of the load. 

Bulky Article – to ensure safe transportation, some articles included in a shipment like big screen TVs, motorcycles, hot tubs, etc., require extra handling and/or blocking. Our tariff provides a schedule of extra charges for such articles.

IRR Surcharge aka Insurance-Related General Increase  –  the carrier’s tariff provides for a percentage adjustment to the transportation charge (and SIT Pickup and Delivery) to aid in the recovery of the increased cost of carrier’s and van operator’s liability insurance expenses. 

Non-Allowables/Prohibited Items – the Carrier will not accept shipment property that will contaminate or damage (i.e., bug infestations, chemicals, propane tanks, etc.) the carrier’s property or the property of other customers, nor will it remove items that would damage the article or the premises like furniture that will not fit through doorways. Further, the carrier will not accept liability for items of a perishable nature like food, wine collections, plants, etc.

Weight Additive – some articles included in a shipment like camper shells, boats, canoes, boat trailers, etc., are comparatively light and occupy space in the van that is not commensurate with their weight. For instance, one might load 4,000 pounds of furniture and cartons in the space taken by a 1,500-pound boat. To compensate for this inequity, our tariff provides a schedule of additional weights for such articles.

Valuing Feedback

After every move Exodus Moving & Storage completes, we will request your input about your moving experience with us. Continuous improvement is the hallmark of our success as a company and we are always anxious to get your feedback on how well we did our moving job.

Competitive and Accurate Estimates

The Cost of relocation is either based on weight or number of men and trucks needed as well as distance traveling. At no charge to you, one of our experienced and courteous Move Coordinators will review their move in great detail and provide you with an accurate move quote. Our Move Coordinator will also confirm requested pick-up and delivery dates.

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Fort Collins

120 NE. Frontage Rd Ste. D
Fort Collins, CO 80524
M-F 8:00am-5:00pm
Sat 8:00am-12:00pm

Littleton

6229 S. Santa Fe Dr
Littleton, CO 80120
M-F 8:00am-5:00pm
Sat 8:00am-12:00pm